search
top

Indicative plan of solid foods introduction

Indicative plan of solid foods introduction from the 7th month (6-7 months) Our updated indicative plan of solid foods introduction. The major changes: – Begin with vegetables and meat, because these are the foods with higher contents of metals and minerals. – Greater personalization and emphasis on breastfeeding – Acknowledgment of the necessity of the introduction of gluten before the age of 7 months to a normal infant – Greater guidance for the month 7-8 months – Acknowledgment of the choice of baby-led feeding

1st week 1st meal 10-11 am 2nd meal 2-3 pm 3rd meal 6-7 pm
MONDAY   Vegetable 1 (1)
TUESDAY   Vegetable 1
WEDNESDAY   + Vegetable 2
THURSDAY   + Vegetable 2
FRIDAY   veal
SATURDAY   + veal
SUNDAY + Vegetable 3
2nd week    
MONDAY Vegetable 3
TUESDAY Fruit 1 (3) Meat soup (2)
WEDNESDAY Fruit 1 Cabbage soup (4)
THURSDAY Fruit 2 Cabbage soup
FRIDAY Fruit 2 Meat soup
SATURDAY Fruit 3 Meat soup
SUNDAY Baby fruit puree Vegetables + chicken (5)
3rd week      
MONDAY Baby fruit puree Meat soup
TUESDAY Baby fruit puree Vegetable soup
WEDNESDAY Baby fruit puree Meat soup
THURSDAY Baby fruit puree + Cereals (6)
FRIDAY Baby fruit puree Meat and vegetable soup  
SATURDAY Baby fruit puree Meat and vegetable soup  
SUNDAY Baby fruit puree Meat and vegetable soup
4th week      
MONDAY Baby fruit puree Meat and vegetable soup
TUESDAY Baby fruit puree + Legumes (7)
WEDNESDAY Baby fruit puree Legumes
THURSDAY Baby fruit puree Chicken soup  
FRIDAY Baby fruit puree Meat soup  
SATURDAY Baby fruit puree Vegetable soup
SUNDAY Baby fruit puree Meat soup

7 – 8 months:

1st week 1st meal 10-11 am 2nd meal 2-3 pm 3rd meal 6-7 pm
MONDAY Baby fruit puree Meat soup Cereals (6)
TUESDAY Baby fruit puree Meat soup Cereals
WEDNESDAY Baby fruit puree Vegetable soup Cereals
THURSDAY Baby fruit puree Vegetable soup Cereals
FRIDAY Baby fruit puree Legumes Cereals
SATURDAY Baby fruit puree Chicken soup Cereals (8)
SUNDAY Baby fruit puree Chicken soup Cereals
2nd week    
MONDAY Baby fruit puree Meat soup Cereals
TUESDAY Baby fruit puree Meat soup Cereals
WEDNESDAY Baby fruit puree Chicken soup Cereals
THURSDAY Baby fruit puree Legumes Cereals
FRIDAY Baby fruit puree Cabbage soup Cereals
SATURDAY Baby fruit puree Cabbage soup Cereals
SUNDAY Baby fruit puree Meat soup Cereals
3rd week      
MONDAY Baby fruit puree Meat soup Cereals
TUESDAY Baby fruit puree Cabbage soup Cereals
WEDNESDAY Baby fruit puree Legumes Cereals
THURSDAY Baby fruit puree Cabbage soup Yogurt (9)
FRIDAY Baby fruit puree Chicken soup Cereals
SATURDAY Baby fruit puree Chicken soup Cereals
SUNDAY Baby fruit puree Meat soup Yogurt
4th week      
MONDAY Baby fruit puree Meat soup Cereals
TUESDAY Baby fruit puree Legumes Cereals
WEDNESDAY Baby fruit puree Cabbage soup Yogurt
THURSDAY Baby fruit puree Chicken soup Cereals
FRIDAY Baby fruit puree Chicken soup Yogurt
SATURDAY Baby fruit puree Meat soup Cereals
SUNDAY Baby fruit puree (11) Fish soup (10) Cereals

At about six months the infant has increased needs for foods which are rich in metals and minerals, like iron and zinc. It is important for solid foods introduction to be realized with continuation of breastfeeding at the same time on child’s demand. Each time a new food is introduced it is toned in black. Add a new food every 2-3 days.

(1) Choose fresh seasonal vegetables. Examples of vegetables which can be given in the beginning are: carrot, courgette, potato, sweet potato, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, celery, peas, avocado, tomato, onion. From the beginning, add a spoon of olive oil to vegetables.

(2) By meat soup we mean vegetables with meat. Regarding composition, meals are well mashed from the beginning, (but not soupy), thick, and they should stay on the spoon. In the course of time all vegetables can be added, like herbs (e.g. parsley, dill, oregano etc.).

(3) Choose fresh seasonal fruits, non-acidic in the beginning. Examples of fruits which can be used at the beginning are apple, pear, banana, mango, melon, watermelon. Then add orange, mandarin, strawberry, peach, kiwi.

(4) In order to get the infant into the habit of the Mediterranean diet, offer meat (red and white) 3 to 5 times per week, replacing it some days of the week with just vegetables and/or legumes.

(5) Besides chicken, as an option gradually introduce turkey, lamb, goat, rabbit.

(6) It is necessary to introduce grains, like those including gluten, before the completion of 7 months. Initially, they can be used in the meat and vegetable soup, while later they can become the basis for the third evening meal. Cereals that can be used are oats (which can also be mixed with fruits), barley, pasta, corn, cereal groats, couscous, rice, quinoa, frumenty.

(7) Legumes should be introduced gradually, by adding, for example, some lentils to the vegetable soup. After the first trials make regular lentil soup, with olive oil on top and without salt. Then follow chickpeas, split peas, beans.

(8) For the evening meal there is the choice of the ready-made cream, with the option of a new one each time, and in order of preference, corn, farin lacte, seven cereal cream, rice flour, vanilla, biscuit cream.

(9) In the 8th month full fat yogurt can constitute a choice. Salt-free, full fat cheese can be added to the food. Fresh milk should not be offered before the age of 12 months.

(10) Fish can be added to the infant’s diet between the ages of 7 and 10 months. Initially white-meat fish: sole, codfish. Then, other fish with beneficial fats, like sardine, salmon, gilthead sea bream. Egg can be added between the ages of 8 and 11 months.

(11) Depending on the readiness of the child, from 7 to 9 months of age, it is necessary to give the child opportunities to learn how to chew non-pureed, soft foods, under supervision. The first trials are done for example with a piece of banana, boiled vegetables, rice croquettes etc., between meals, in the form of a snack.

  Important notes

  • These tables are an example, an idea of how to start. You can modify the program according to your or your child’s special preferences.
  • The new food of each day is toned in black.
  • At the phase of one meal, one meal per day can be given either as brunch or as lunch, depending on your preference.
  • Solid food meals, at least initially, don’t replace breastfeeding, but supplement it. At first the baby may eat a small quantity, so it is possible that he will also need milk at the end. Breastfeeding continues on the infant’s demand.
  • When starting solid foods, start offering water to the baby. It is better to do this with a training cup, an open glass, a spoon, or straw.
  • The first time you offer a new food, give a small quantity, just a few spoons as a test. Then, let the baby determine the amount he wants to eat each time.
  • All creams should be completely pureed and liquid for the younger baby.  As the baby grows, they should become thicker and include small pieces.
  • There are infants who don’t show a preference for creams and spoons, but prefer from the beginning, or very early on, soft, but shaped foods, which they can eat with their fingers. If you are interested in this way of introducing solid foods, consult books and sources on baby-led weaning.
  • Never give two new foods on the same day.
  • Each food, which has been tested and considered to be safe, can be added subsequently to new foods for variety, in combinations of your choice. It is not advisable to introduce too many foods per day, but it is better to alternate them by adding variety to the taste for the infant, e.g. 2-3 vegetables per meal.
  • Breast milk can be added to some meals as an option.
  • If the baby refuses or reacts to a new food, withdraw it for 7-10 days, and then try again.
  • Avoid salt, spices, pepper, cooked oil, sugar, honey, for the whole first year.
  • Remember that milk continues to be the main food until the completion of the first year. It is normal for the child to prefer milk when it is sick or has a cold. Don’t introduce new foods when the child has a cold or has had a vaccination.
  • The rate of introduction of one, two, and three meals per day is also indicative and should be personalized for each child. Α very quick introduction of three or more meals carries the risk of sharp decline of breastfeeding.
  • Readiness for solid foods for most infants ranges between 5 and 7 months. However, there are infants who don’t show particular interest in solid foods while breastfeeding until the age of 8 months.  It is usually adequate to simply monitor and encourage, if there is no stagnation in growth. If the child continues to deny solid foods, the doctor may decide to check iron stores.

Stelios Papaventsis ΜRCPCH DCH IBCLC 2013

Relevant Articles

Σχετικά Άρθρα

top
Όροι Χρήσης | Εμπιστευτικότητα | Πνευματικά Δικαιώματα | Login